FICO® Score Estimator

You can roughly estimate your actual credit score with this free score estimator from FICO®, the most trusted name in credit scoring. Here's how it works: Answer these ten easy questions and we'll give you a free estimated range for your three FICO® scores.

What do you mean I might not have a score?
You won't have a credit score unless you're older than 18 and you've had a credit card in your own name for longer than six months. So, if you're young or you pay with cash, you likely don't have a score. Or, if you're young and have only had a single credit card for a short period of time, you may not have a score yet either. So go ahead and answer the questions and get an idea. It's free, it's easy, and you don't have to give up any personal information.

To find out more about credit scores, credit reports, and how to improve your score, visit break the code.

1. How many credit cards do you have?

I have never had a credit card
1
2 to 4
5 or more

2. How long ago did you get your first loan?

(i.e., auto loan, mortgage, student loan, etc.)







Part 1 of 3

How FICO Scores Work

When you apply for credit - whether for a credit card, a car loan, or a mortgage - lenders want to know what risk they’d take by loaning money to you.

FICO scores are the credit scores most lenders use to determine your credit risk. You have three FICO scores, one for each of the three credit bureaus - Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Each score is based on information the credit bureau keeps on file about you. As this information changes, your credit scores tend to change as well.

Your 3 FICO scores affect both how much and what loan terms (interest rate, etc.) lenders will offer you at any given time.

Taking steps to get your FICO scores in the higher ranges can help you qualify for better rates from lenders.